Mid-Day Mini ~ Far and Away

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The Facts:

Synopsis: A young man leaves Ireland with his landlord’s daughter, dreaming of owning land at the big giveaway in 1893 Oklahoma.

Stars: Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman, Thomas Gibson, Robert Prosky, Barbara Babcock, Colm Meaney

Director: Ron Howard

Rated: PG-13

Running Length: 140 minutes

TMMM Score: (6/10)

Review:  Though director Ron Howard was already a proven commodity in Hollywood by the time Far and Away rolled around in 1992, the filmmaker had yet to direct a true epic which most seasoned directors attempt at one point in their career.  Coming off another success with Backdraft, Howard (Splash, Parenthood, Gung Ho, The Paper) sidled up with two hot stars for a film intended to be sweeping and grandiose…the type of film that Hollywood didn’t make anymore.

The final product wasn’t received with the same vigor of old Hollywood epics like Gone With the Wind but it was a moderate success…fueled on by the star power at play and the audiences that were starved for an old-fashioned large scale romance (they’d only have to wait five years until Titanic came along though).

I vividly remember seeing Far and Away in the theaters in its opening weekend at a theater that was projecting it in 70mm…a high-resolution film that fits perfectly with a movie as ambitious as Far and Away.  Though many theaters are only able to show films in 35mm, several theaters in my town were showing it the way it was shot and meant to be seen…and it truly was an impressively immersive experience.  Howard and cinematographer Mikael Salomon (The Abyss) capture the time period with great attention to detail and provide the audience with awe-inspiring visuals of the climatic and treacherous final act detailing the Oklahoma Land Rush.

Though Cruise (Oblivion, Rock of Ages, Jack Reacher) and Kidman (Stoker) have the kind of chemistry that comes along once in a blue moon, there’s precious little true heat that develops during the lengthy running time.  Individually they deliver but it’s curious that so many of their scenes together fall a little flat.  Maybe it’s knowing that their marriage would eventually sour that doesn’t allow the audience to truly buy into what they create onscreen…or maybe it’s that the script from Howard and Bob Dolman doesn’t give them much to work with aside from a fairly standard set-up.

Kudos do go to Howard and his team for attempting to mount a project of this size and stature.  Thankfully avoiding becoming a rancid vanity project for the lead couple, the movie is far and away not the best work of anyone involved but still impresses with the skilled contributions behind the scenes.

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